The process of the garment ink

1. Only print color inks on garment

  • Temperature for heat press: 330F—340F(166oC—170oC)
  • Time for pressing: 60S
  • Pressure: Low
  • Silicone paper on the garment before the pressing

Only print white inks on garment

First step: Pressing garment use the heat press machine with high pressure, It can ensure the t-shirt Cotton fiber becomes smooth. So that you can print graphics

Time for pressing:90 – 120S

Pretreatment
The print Area is 14cm*17cm, The amount of the treatment liquid is 20-25g(0.7 0z.-0.9 Oz.)
Most of treatment liquid will block the white ink permeate into the cotton, The white ink float on the t-shirt cotton, it can washed off by water, the image will Peel or crack. Used right amount treatment liquid can ensure print quality and washing degrees.

Step 2 After the Pretreatment

  • A. Silicone paper on the garment before the pressing
  • B. Temperature for heat press: 330F—340F(166oC—170oC)
  • C. Time for heat press: 30s-45s
    This time is to be observed to steam treatment liquid (smoke) in the hot pressing process, which can ensure the clothes are dried, the treatment liquid has been evaporated.
  • D. Pressure: Heavy
    Pressing garment use the heat press machine with heavy pressure, It can ensure the t-shirt Cotton fiber becomes smooth. So that you can print graphics

Correct Pre-treatment

The image below represents a shirt that has been properly pre-treated, printed, heat-pressed and subsequently washed through three (3) industrial washes. Note the white underbase and color retention.

This is a properly treated, printed and post-treated shirt.

 

Insufficient Pre-treatment

If too little pre-treatment solution is applied, the white ink will have a mottled appearance after printing. This is due to an insufficient amount of pre-treatment to keep the white ink layer on the surface (the ink soaks into the fibers of the shirt).

An example of insufficient pre-treatment:

 

Excessive Pre-treatment

Applying too much pre-treatment solution will provide you with a very good looking print prior to washing. However, excessive application of pre-treatment will cause poor wash fastness and durability. The white layer becomes much more susceptible to flaking off of the shirt in a wash if too much pre-treatment is applied.

Below, the shirt with an excessive amount of pre-treatment looks very good after printing and pressing:

The same shirt, with excessive pre-treatment solution applied is shown below after washing. This shirt exhibits cracking and loss of color associated with too much pre-treatment being applied.

The step up after white and color ink printing

  • A. Temperature for heat press: 330F—340F(166oC—170oC)
  • B. Time for heat press: 90s – 120s
  • C. Pressure: Low
  • D. Silicone paper on the garment before the pressing

Washing method
When finished printing and heat pressing, Start washing after one day.

Correct Pre-treatment

The image below represents a shirt that has been properly pre-treated, printed, heat-pressed and subsequently washed through three (3) industrial washes. Note the white underbase and color retention.

This is a properly treated, printed and post-treated shirt.

 

Insufficient Pre-treatment

If too little pre-treatment solution is applied, the white ink will have a mottled appearance after printing. This is due to an insufficient amount of pre-treatment to keep the white ink layer on the surface (the ink soaks into the fibers of the shirt).

An example of insufficient pre-treatment:

 

Excessive Pre-treatment

Applying too much pre-treatment solution will provide you with a very good looking print prior to washing. However, excessive application of pre-treatment will cause poor wash fastness and durability. The white layer becomes much more susceptible to flaking off of the shirt in a wash if too much pre-treatment is applied.

Below, the shirt with an excessive amount of pre-treatment looks very good after printing and pressing:

The same shirt, with excessive pre-treatment solution applied is shown below after washing. This shirt exhibits cracking and loss of color associated with too much pre-treatment being applied.